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dc.contributor.advisorRomans, John S. C.
dc.contributor.authorHills, Sara J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-20T18:35:42Z
dc.date.available2019-03-20T18:35:42Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/11244/317604
dc.description.abstractExercise and meditation have been shown to improve wellness and to help maintain a healthy lifestyle, yet the effects of meditation and movement together have been largely ignored. This current mixed-methods study utilized a convergent independent three-arm design to explore the experiences and benefits of walking a labyrinth, a form of meditative movement (MM), as a complementary treatment for depression and/or anxiety. College students experiencing depression and/or anxiety who were at least 18 years old from a Midwest university were sequentially assigned to one of three groups: treatment (TG), active control (ACG), or wait-list control (WCG). TG and ACG participants completed 20 minute walking sessions once a week for four weeks in either a labyrinth (TG), on a rectangular path (ACG), or in a labyrinth following a wait period (WCG). This study sought to determine if MM in a labyrinth reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression and raised levels of self-compassion. Observation Oriented Modelling (OOM) results from pre- and post-measures of anxiety, depression, and self-compassion suggested participants in the ACG experienced the greatest reduction in symptoms of anxiety and participants in the TG may have seen the greatest increase in level of self-compassion. Phenomenological analysis of journal entries, naturalistic observations, and open-ended questionnaires suggested the vast majority of participants in both the TG and ACG enjoyed their sessions and found them to be peaceful, simple, and a welcome break from the stress of daily life. Four main themes were found in the qualitative data that may help readers to better understand the experiences of the participants: Expectations vs. Openness, Inner and Outer Contexts, Coping Mechanisms, and Distress Tolerance. Discussions of quantitative and qualitative data intersections are explored and future directions for investigating MM in a labyrinth as a complementary treatment are suggested.
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dc.languageen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author who has granted the Oklahoma State University Library the non-exclusive right to share this material in its institutional repository. Contact Digital Library Services at lib-dls@okstate.edu or 405-744-9161 for the permission policy on the use, reproduction or distribution of this material.
dc.titleEffects of Walking a Labyrinth on Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety and Level of Self-Compassion
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLee, Hang-Shim
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKoch, Julie Mae
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHammer, Tonya R.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMullins, Larry Lee
osu.filenameHills_okstate_0664D_15813.pdf
osu.accesstypeOpen Access
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychology
dc.type.genreDissertation
dc.type.materialText


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